Mission

The primary focus of the MUUS Collection is to bring together American photography archives from the twentieth century.

Our mission as custodians of this collection is to make visible these exceptional photography archives through exhibitions, scholarship, donations, licensing, and the printing of images and books.

About

The MUUS Collection brings together photographic works that mark major turning points in American history, ultimately creating a road map of our shared past. We believe in the unique power of photography as an inimitable touchstone of collective cultural memory, and it is our goal to preserve and promote these invaluable artifacts for generations to come.

As a functional archive, the MUUS Collection builds, preserves, studies, and shares its outstanding collections of American photography, generating new scholarship and understanding, while instigating interesting and relevant dialogues within the wider photography community. The combined art, archival, and research materials that make up the MUUS Collection ultimately serve to deepen our appreciation of how photography impacts society.

We are dedicated to the critical understanding of historical photography and related media, and aim to highlight the ways in which the visual arts can facilitate a reflection of our shared American history. Where did we come from, and where are we going? What have we learned from our victories and mistakes, and how can we filter these lessons productively through our current moment?

In honor of #TransVisibiltyDay, as well as the last day of #WomensHistoryMonth, we’re remembering legendary Warhol Superstar, Candy Darling!

Born in 1944 in Queens, NYC, Candy loved Hollywood glamour from the time she was small. Bullied intensely at school, she dropped out at 16, and at 17, she came out to her mother after being confronted for rumors of cross-dressing. Her mother later said “I knew then... that I couldn’t stop [her]... Candy was just too beautiful and talented.”

She initially adopted the name Hope Slattery in the early 60s, as she began frequenting gay bars in Manhattan and visiting a doctor on 5th Avenue for hormone injections.
She soon met Andy Warhol, who casted in his films after seeing her perform in a play that she had written and directed. From there, her fame grew - Candy starred in more theatre, including the original production of Tennessee Williams’ “Small Craft Warnings”, at the playwright’s request. She also appeared in more independent and international films, including Klute with Jane Fonda (who you can learn about in our recent post).

Darling is even immortalized in music, mentioned by name in Lou Reed’s classic “Walk on the Wild Side” and the Velvet Underground’s “Candy Says”.

In 1974, Candy died of lymphoma at age 29. Her funeral was attended by huge crowds of friends and celebrities. Neither the priest nor eulogizers made mention of her birth name.

So many trans stories involve painful trials and suffering - while Candy was no stranger to these, she lived her life boldly, beautifully, and authentically, surrounded by people who adored her. We wish the same for all our transgender brothers, sisters, and siblings ❤️

1) Candy Darling and Tom Eyan arrive at Obie Awards, shot by Fred McDarrah. May 8, 1972.

2) Candy sits on Dave Susskind’s “FreeTime” TV program, shot by Fred McDarrah. December 7, 1970.

© Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
In honor of #TransVisibiltyDay, as well as the last day of #WomensHistoryMonth, we’re remembering legendary Warhol Superstar, Candy Darling! Born in 1944 in Queens, NYC, Candy loved Hollywood glamour from the time she was small. Bullied intensely at school, she dropped out at 16, and at 17, she came out to her mother after being confronted for rumors of cross-dressing. Her mother later said “I knew then... that I couldn’t stop [her]... Candy was just too beautiful and talented.” She initially adopted the name Hope Slattery in the early 60s, as she began frequenting gay bars in Manhattan and visiting a doctor on 5th Avenue for hormone injections. She soon met Andy Warhol, who casted in his films after seeing her perform in a play that she had written and directed. From there, her fame grew - Candy starred in more theatre, including the original production of Tennessee Williams’ “Small Craft Warnings”, at the playwright’s request. She also appeared in more independent and international films, including Klute with Jane Fonda (who you can learn about in our recent post). Darling is even immortalized in music, mentioned by name in Lou Reed’s classic “Walk on the Wild Side” and the Velvet Underground’s “Candy Says”. In 1974, Candy died of lymphoma at age 29. Her funeral was attended by huge crowds of friends and celebrities. Neither the priest nor eulogizers made mention of her birth name. So many trans stories involve painful trials and suffering - while Candy was no stranger to these, she lived her life boldly, beautifully, and authentically, surrounded by people who adored her. We wish the same for all our transgender brothers, sisters, and siblings ❤️ 1) Candy Darling and Tom Eyan arrive at Obie Awards, shot by Fred McDarrah. May 8, 1972. 2) Candy sits on Dave Susskind’s “FreeTime” TV program, shot by Fred McDarrah. December 7, 1970. © Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
If there’s one person who can unite America, it’s Dolly Parton. Dolly is not only a universally loved, award winning singer-songwriter, but a talented multi-instrumentalist, an actress, an author, and a philanthropist.

Before stardom, Dolly had humble beginnings in the rural town of Locust Ridge, Tennessee. One of 12 children, she was born into a musical family and credits her church with her early music education. Her now iconic flashy style and big hair was, she said, modeled “after the town tramp... Momma used to say, “Aw, she’s just trash,” and I thought, that’s what I want to be when I grow up. Trash.” (Dolly is also loved for her self-effacing good humor and quippy “Dollyisms”.)

Dolly started performing at a young age, appearing at the Grand Ole Opry @opry at 13 years old. Starting her music career right out of high school, she was quick to found her own record label and publisher, preserving her rights to her own music. Among her most well known songs are “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You” (famously covered by Whitney Houston), as well as “9 to 5” - the title song for the movie in which she starred alongside Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda (who you can learn more about in yesterday’s post!). Young millennials may also remember her recurring cameos as “Aunt Dolly” on Disney Channel’s Hannah Montana. Most recently, Dolly executive produced the Netflix series “Heartstrings”, an anthology based on her music. Beyond music and film, she even has her own theme park: Dollywood, in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

Dolly is also admired for her philanthropy. In 1988, she created the Dollywood Foundation, which is devoted to decreasing high school dropout rates, and awards scholarships to high school seniors headed for higher education. She also founded Imagination Library in 1995, which distributes books to children worldwide. Dolly made news in 2020 for contributing $1 million to Covid vaccine research at @vanderbiltu , and as she received her shot, encouraged others to do the same with a rewrite of her timeless “Jolene”, called “Vaccine”.

© Allan Tannenbaum/MUUS Collection
If there’s one person who can unite America, it’s Dolly Parton. Dolly is not only a universally loved, award winning singer-songwriter, but a talented multi-instrumentalist, an actress, an author, and a philanthropist. Before stardom, Dolly had humble beginnings in the rural town of Locust Ridge, Tennessee. One of 12 children, she was born into a musical family and credits her church with her early music education. Her now iconic flashy style and big hair was, she said, modeled “after the town tramp... Momma used to say, “Aw, she’s just trash,” and I thought, that’s what I want to be when I grow up. Trash.” (Dolly is also loved for her self-effacing good humor and quippy “Dollyisms”.) Dolly started performing at a young age, appearing at the Grand Ole Opry @opry at 13 years old. Starting her music career right out of high school, she was quick to found her own record label and publisher, preserving her rights to her own music. Among her most well known songs are “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You” (famously covered by Whitney Houston), as well as “9 to 5” - the title song for the movie in which she starred alongside Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda (who you can learn more about in yesterday’s post!). Young millennials may also remember her recurring cameos as “Aunt Dolly” on Disney Channel’s Hannah Montana. Most recently, Dolly executive produced the Netflix series “Heartstrings”, an anthology based on her music. Beyond music and film, she even has her own theme park: Dollywood, in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Dolly is also admired for her philanthropy. In 1988, she created the Dollywood Foundation, which is devoted to decreasing high school dropout rates, and awards scholarships to high school seniors headed for higher education. She also founded Imagination Library in 1995, which distributes books to children worldwide. Dolly made news in 2020 for contributing $1 million to Covid vaccine research at @vanderbiltu , and as she received her shot, encouraged others to do the same with a rewrite of her timeless “Jolene”, called “Vaccine”. © Allan Tannenbaum/MUUS Collection
In honor of #TransVisibiltyDay, as well as the last day of #WomensHistoryMonth, we’re remembering legendary Warhol Superstar, Candy Darling!

Born in 1944 in Queens, NYC, Candy loved Hollywood glamour from the time she was small. Bullied intensely at school, she dropped out at 16, and at 17, she came out to her mother after being confronted for rumors of cross-dressing. Her mother later said “I knew then... that I couldn’t stop [her]... Candy was just too beautiful and talented.”

She initially adopted the name Hope Slattery in the early 60s, as she began frequenting gay bars in Manhattan and visiting a doctor on 5th Avenue for hormone injections.
She soon met Andy Warhol, who casted in his films after seeing her perform in a play that she had written and directed. From there, her fame grew - Candy starred in more theatre, including the original production of Tennessee Williams’ “Small Craft Warnings”, at the playwright’s request. She also appeared in more independent and international films, including Klute with Jane Fonda (who you can learn about in our recent post).

Darling is even immortalized in music, mentioned by name in Lou Reed’s classic “Walk on the Wild Side” and the Velvet Underground’s “Candy Says”.

In 1974, Candy died of lymphoma at age 29. Her funeral was attended by huge crowds of friends and celebrities. Neither the priest nor eulogizers made mention of her birth name.

So many trans stories involve painful trials and suffering - while Candy was no stranger to these, she lived her life boldly, beautifully, and authentically, surrounded by people who adored her. We wish the same for all our transgender brothers, sisters, and siblings ❤️

1) Candy Darling and Tom Eyan arrive at Obie Awards, shot by Fred McDarrah. May 8, 1972.

2) Candy sits on Dave Susskind’s “FreeTime” TV program, shot by Fred McDarrah. December 7, 1970.

© Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
In honor of #TransVisibiltyDay, as well as the last day of #WomensHistoryMonth, we’re remembering legendary Warhol Superstar, Candy Darling! Born in 1944 in Queens, NYC, Candy loved Hollywood glamour from the time she was small. Bullied intensely at school, she dropped out at 16, and at 17, she came out to her mother after being confronted for rumors of cross-dressing. Her mother later said “I knew then... that I couldn’t stop [her]... Candy was just too beautiful and talented.” She initially adopted the name Hope Slattery in the early 60s, as she began frequenting gay bars in Manhattan and visiting a doctor on 5th Avenue for hormone injections. She soon met Andy Warhol, who casted in his films after seeing her perform in a play that she had written and directed. From there, her fame grew - Candy starred in more theatre, including the original production of Tennessee Williams’ “Small Craft Warnings”, at the playwright’s request. She also appeared in more independent and international films, including Klute with Jane Fonda (who you can learn about in our recent post). Darling is even immortalized in music, mentioned by name in Lou Reed’s classic “Walk on the Wild Side” and the Velvet Underground’s “Candy Says”. In 1974, Candy died of lymphoma at age 29. Her funeral was attended by huge crowds of friends and celebrities. Neither the priest nor eulogizers made mention of her birth name. So many trans stories involve painful trials and suffering - while Candy was no stranger to these, she lived her life boldly, beautifully, and authentically, surrounded by people who adored her. We wish the same for all our transgender brothers, sisters, and siblings ❤️ 1) Candy Darling and Tom Eyan arrive at Obie Awards, shot by Fred McDarrah. May 8, 1972. 2) Candy sits on Dave Susskind’s “FreeTime” TV program, shot by Fred McDarrah. December 7, 1970. © Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
If there’s one person who can unite America, it’s Dolly Parton. Dolly is not only a universally loved, award winning singer-songwriter, but a talented multi-instrumentalist, an actress, an author, and a philanthropist.

Before stardom, Dolly had humble beginnings in the rural town of Locust Ridge, Tennessee. One of 12 children, she was born into a musical family and credits her church with her early music education. Her now iconic flashy style and big hair was, she said, modeled “after the town tramp... Momma used to say, “Aw, she’s just trash,” and I thought, that’s what I want to be when I grow up. Trash.” (Dolly is also loved for her self-effacing good humor and quippy “Dollyisms”.)

Dolly started performing at a young age, appearing at the Grand Ole Opry @opry at 13 years old. Starting her music career right out of high school, she was quick to found her own record label and publisher, preserving her rights to her own music. Among her most well known songs are “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You” (famously covered by Whitney Houston), as well as “9 to 5” - the title song for the movie in which she starred alongside Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda (who you can learn more about in yesterday’s post!). Young millennials may also remember her recurring cameos as “Aunt Dolly” on Disney Channel’s Hannah Montana. Most recently, Dolly executive produced the Netflix series “Heartstrings”, an anthology based on her music. Beyond music and film, she even has her own theme park: Dollywood, in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

Dolly is also admired for her philanthropy. In 1988, she created the Dollywood Foundation, which is devoted to decreasing high school dropout rates, and awards scholarships to high school seniors headed for higher education. She also founded Imagination Library in 1995, which distributes books to children worldwide. Dolly made news in 2020 for contributing $1 million to Covid vaccine research at @vanderbiltu , and as she received her shot, encouraged others to do the same with a rewrite of her timeless “Jolene”, called “Vaccine”.

© Allan Tannenbaum/MUUS Collection
If there’s one person who can unite America, it’s Dolly Parton. Dolly is not only a universally loved, award winning singer-songwriter, but a talented multi-instrumentalist, an actress, an author, and a philanthropist. Before stardom, Dolly had humble beginnings in the rural town of Locust Ridge, Tennessee. One of 12 children, she was born into a musical family and credits her church with her early music education. Her now iconic flashy style and big hair was, she said, modeled “after the town tramp... Momma used to say, “Aw, she’s just trash,” and I thought, that’s what I want to be when I grow up. Trash.” (Dolly is also loved for her self-effacing good humor and quippy “Dollyisms”.) Dolly started performing at a young age, appearing at the Grand Ole Opry @opry at 13 years old. Starting her music career right out of high school, she was quick to found her own record label and publisher, preserving her rights to her own music. Among her most well known songs are “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You” (famously covered by Whitney Houston), as well as “9 to 5” - the title song for the movie in which she starred alongside Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda (who you can learn more about in yesterday’s post!). Young millennials may also remember her recurring cameos as “Aunt Dolly” on Disney Channel’s Hannah Montana. Most recently, Dolly executive produced the Netflix series “Heartstrings”, an anthology based on her music. Beyond music and film, she even has her own theme park: Dollywood, in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Dolly is also admired for her philanthropy. In 1988, she created the Dollywood Foundation, which is devoted to decreasing high school dropout rates, and awards scholarships to high school seniors headed for higher education. She also founded Imagination Library in 1995, which distributes books to children worldwide. Dolly made news in 2020 for contributing $1 million to Covid vaccine research at @vanderbiltu , and as she received her shot, encouraged others to do the same with a rewrite of her timeless “Jolene”, called “Vaccine”. © Allan Tannenbaum/MUUS Collection
Today in #WomensHistory: Jane Seymour Fonda may be about as well-known still as she was at the start of her career. She has been everything from a fashion model to an award-winning actress, to a political and environmental activist.
Born on December 21, 1937, Fonda’s parents were Canadian socialite Frances Ford Brokaw and Hollywood actor Henry Fonda. Her career began in the late ‘50s, when she left @vassarcollege to pursue acting. She has starred in many well-received films and TV shows since 1960, earning herself two Academy Awards, two BAFTAs, multiple Golden Globes, an Emmy, and more. In 1982 she released “Jane Fonda’s Workout”, the highest selling VHS of all time.
In the ‘70s, outside of her career, Fonda took up activism in step with the women’s liberation movement, anti-Vietnam War efforts, the Black Panther Party, Native American rights, and environmentalism.
Though the 90s saw a hiatus of her acting career, she returned in 2005 to star in Netflix comedy “Grace and Frankie” while also co-founding the @womensmediacenter with Gloria Steinem (who you can learn more about from our recent post!)

Fonda is seen here, photographed by Allan Tannenbaum as she speaks at an “Anti-Nuke” demonstration on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., May 6, 1979.

© Allan Tannenbaum/MUUS Collection

#womenshistorymonth #blackhistory #photography #documentaryphotography #filmphotography #film #filmisnotdead #photoftheday #blackandwhitephotography #muuscollection #archives #janeseymourfonda #janefonda #barefootinthepark #graceandfrankie #9to5 #activism #environmentalism #climatechange #BlackPanthers #henryfonda #janefondasworkout #vassarcollege #nonukes #washingtondc #antiwar #feminism #womensrights #womensliberation
Today in #WomensHistory: Jane Seymour Fonda may be about as well-known still as she was at the start of her career. She has been everything from a fashion model to an award-winning actress, to a political and environmental activist. Born on December 21, 1937, Fonda’s parents were Canadian socialite Frances Ford Brokaw and Hollywood actor Henry Fonda. Her career began in the late ‘50s, when she left @vassarcollege to pursue acting. She has starred in many well-received films and TV shows since 1960, earning herself two Academy Awards, two BAFTAs, multiple Golden Globes, an Emmy, and more. In 1982 she released “Jane Fonda’s Workout”, the highest selling VHS of all time. In the ‘70s, outside of her career, Fonda took up activism in step with the women’s liberation movement, anti-Vietnam War efforts, the Black Panther Party, Native American rights, and environmentalism. Though the 90s saw a hiatus of her acting career, she returned in 2005 to star in Netflix comedy “Grace and Frankie” while also co-founding the @womensmediacenter with Gloria Steinem (who you can learn more about from our recent post!) Fonda is seen here, photographed by Allan Tannenbaum as she speaks at an “Anti-Nuke” demonstration on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., May 6, 1979. © Allan Tannenbaum/MUUS Collection #womenshistorymonth #blackhistory #photography #documentaryphotography #filmphotography #film #filmisnotdead #photoftheday #blackandwhitephotography #muuscollection #archives #janeseymourfonda #janefonda #barefootinthepark #graceandfrankie #9to5 #activism #environmentalism #climatechange #BlackPanthers #henryfonda #janefondasworkout #vassarcollege #nonukes #washingtondc #antiwar #feminism #womensrights #womensliberation
Regram from @staleywisegallery : In celebration of Women’s History Month, Staley-Wise Gallery will feature several of our photographers throughout the month of March.⁣
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Deborah Turbeville was born in Boston, Massachusetts. After completing school, she moved to New York intending to pursue a career in theater.  However, within a very short time she was discovered by famed fashion designer Claire McCardell and was asked to join her design studio. Through McCardell, Turbeville met Diana Vreeland, the famed editor of Harper's Bazaar and later VOGUE, and the eventual director of the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Vreeland suggested that Turbeville see her at her offices at Harper's Bazaar, and Turbeville soon became an editor at the magazine. ⁣
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Over the years, her photographs were published in the American, Italian, and Russian editions of VOGUE, Harper’s, VOGUE Casa, W, VOGUE Bambino, VOGUE Sposa, Zoom, Conde Nast Traveler, The New York Times, The London Sunday Times, and Art in America. Turbeville also photographed special portfolios and advertising campaigns for the designers Emanuel Ungaro, Romeo Gigli, and Valentino (as recently as 2011).⁣
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For the past three decades, Turbeville opened solo exhibitions around the world at galleries and museums such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Museo Tamayo Arte Contemporaneo in Mexico City, and the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. Her work is included in the permanent collections of these institutions, as well as in the collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, and the Museum of Fine Art in Boston, among others.⁣
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Deborah Turbeville, “Stigmata: Isabella at Ecole Des Beaux Arts, Paris, 1977” (© MUUS Collection)⁣
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Deborah Turbeville, “From the Valentino Collection, 1977” (© MUUS Collection)⁣
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Deborah Turbeville, “Women in the Woods: Isabella and Elle, VOGUE Italia, Montova, Italy, 1977” (© MUUS Collection)⁣
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Deborah Turbeville, “Unseen Versailles: Aurelia Weingarten, 1980” (© MUUS Collection)⁣
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Deborah Turbeville, “Self Portrait, Versailles, 1981” (© MUU
Regram from @staleywisegallery : In celebration of Women’s History Month, Staley-Wise Gallery will feature several of our photographers throughout the month of March.⁣ ⁣ Deborah Turbeville was born in Boston, Massachusetts. After completing school, she moved to New York intending to pursue a career in theater. However, within a very short time she was discovered by famed fashion designer Claire McCardell and was asked to join her design studio. Through McCardell, Turbeville met Diana Vreeland, the famed editor of Harper's Bazaar and later VOGUE, and the eventual director of the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Vreeland suggested that Turbeville see her at her offices at Harper's Bazaar, and Turbeville soon became an editor at the magazine. ⁣ ⁣ Over the years, her photographs were published in the American, Italian, and Russian editions of VOGUE, Harper’s, VOGUE Casa, W, VOGUE Bambino, VOGUE Sposa, Zoom, Conde Nast Traveler, The New York Times, The London Sunday Times, and Art in America. Turbeville also photographed special portfolios and advertising campaigns for the designers Emanuel Ungaro, Romeo Gigli, and Valentino (as recently as 2011).⁣ ⁣ For the past three decades, Turbeville opened solo exhibitions around the world at galleries and museums such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Museo Tamayo Arte Contemporaneo in Mexico City, and the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. Her work is included in the permanent collections of these institutions, as well as in the collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, and the Museum of Fine Art in Boston, among others.⁣ ⁣ Deborah Turbeville, “Stigmata: Isabella at Ecole Des Beaux Arts, Paris, 1977” (© MUUS Collection)⁣ ⁣ Deborah Turbeville, “From the Valentino Collection, 1977” (© MUUS Collection)⁣ ⁣ Deborah Turbeville, “Women in the Woods: Isabella and Elle, VOGUE Italia, Montova, Italy, 1977” (© MUUS Collection)⁣ ⁣ Deborah Turbeville, “Unseen Versailles: Aurelia Weingarten, 1980” (© MUUS Collection)⁣ ⁣ Deborah Turbeville, “Self Portrait, Versailles, 1981” (© MUU
Pictured here are Jewelle Gomez (left) and Joan Nestle (right), two icons of LGBT literature you should know about!

Gomez considers herself a possible foremother of Afrofuturism and is best known for her lesbian feminist novel The Gilda Stories. which reframes vampire mythology. In the 1970s she was a member of the lesbian feminist literary magazine Conditions. Gomez has published essays, poems, plays and short fiction, which have been included in over a hundred different anthologies. She was on the founding board of GLAAD in 1984, and later wrote extensively in favor of equal marriage rights. She is currently the Director of Grants and Community Initiatives for Horizons Foundation, and President of the San Francisco Public Library Commission

Nestle is a founder of the Lesbian Herstory Archives. This project, which grew out of her NYC apartment, aims to shift history towards inclusivity of women, lesbians, and Jews. She was involved in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, and devoted her focus to gay liberation after the Stonewall Riots. Through the ‘80s and ‘90s she published two books of collected writings and edited various anthologies and collections of LGBT voices. She is especially known for 1992 anthology “The Persistent Desire: A Femme-Butch Reader”.

Both Gomez and Nestle are holders of Lambda Literary Awards, which are given to celebrate American LGBT literature.
The two are seen here at an awards ceremony at NYC Comptroller Liz Holtzman's office on June 26, 1991
© Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection

#womenshistory #womenshistorymonth #blackhistory #photography #documentaryphotography #filmphotography #film #filmisnotdead #photoftheday #blackandwhitephotography #muuscollection #LGBThistory #gayhistory #womenshistory #archives #equalrights #civilrights #stonewall #lesbianhistory #GLAAD #herstory #literature #fredmcdarrah
Pictured here are Jewelle Gomez (left) and Joan Nestle (right), two icons of LGBT literature you should know about! Gomez considers herself a possible foremother of Afrofuturism and is best known for her lesbian feminist novel The Gilda Stories. which reframes vampire mythology. In the 1970s she was a member of the lesbian feminist literary magazine Conditions. Gomez has published essays, poems, plays and short fiction, which have been included in over a hundred different anthologies. She was on the founding board of GLAAD in 1984, and later wrote extensively in favor of equal marriage rights. She is currently the Director of Grants and Community Initiatives for Horizons Foundation, and President of the San Francisco Public Library Commission Nestle is a founder of the Lesbian Herstory Archives. This project, which grew out of her NYC apartment, aims to shift history towards inclusivity of women, lesbians, and Jews. She was involved in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, and devoted her focus to gay liberation after the Stonewall Riots. Through the ‘80s and ‘90s she published two books of collected writings and edited various anthologies and collections of LGBT voices. She is especially known for 1992 anthology “The Persistent Desire: A Femme-Butch Reader”. Both Gomez and Nestle are holders of Lambda Literary Awards, which are given to celebrate American LGBT literature. The two are seen here at an awards ceremony at NYC Comptroller Liz Holtzman's office on June 26, 1991 © Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection #womenshistory #womenshistorymonth #blackhistory #photography #documentaryphotography #filmphotography #film #filmisnotdead #photoftheday #blackandwhitephotography #muuscollection #LGBThistory #gayhistory #womenshistory #archives #equalrights #civilrights #stonewall #lesbianhistory #GLAAD #herstory #literature #fredmcdarrah
In going from freelance reporter to feminist icon, Gloria Steinem has stayed busy.
In 1956, Steinem earned a BA from Smith College. After a post-graduation law fellowship, she turned to freelance journalism. In 1963, she wrote an article for Show magazine that put her on the map. To write the article, she went undercover as a Playboy Bunny in order to expose exploitative working conditions in Playboy clubs. It was initially difficult for Steinem to find work after “A Bunny’s Tale” was published, but in 1968 she went on to co-found New York magazine. There, she was able to report on her interests in politics and social issues.
In 1969, Steinem attended a “speak-out” on abortion legalization to report for the magazine. She described it as the beginning of her life as a “active feminist”, and allowed her to feel that she shouldn’t be ashamed for an illegal abortion she had at the age of 22.
In 1971 co-founded both the National Women’s Political Caucus and the Women’s Action Alliance. In 1972 she co-founded feminist magazine “Ms.”, which would cover the women’s liberation movement and women’s rights issues specifically. Over her life, Steinem has been heavily involved in political campaigns as well as activism in favor of world peace and reproductive freedom. She is especially known as a speaker and writer in the name of women’s rights and feminism. She has received awards for journalism, humanitarianism, gay rights, and women’s empowerment, among others. Steinem has also been portrayed on stage, TV, and in film. At age 86, she is still a world-renowned lecturer and organizer.

Steinem is pictured here, speaking at the National Women's Political Caucus at the Four Seasons in 1974. © Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection

#womenshistory #womenshistorymonth #photography #photos #filmphotography #film #filmisnotdead #photoftheday #blackandwhitephotography #muuscollection #gloriasteinem #feminism #liberalfeminism #radicalfeminism #intersectionalfemninism #feminist #womenslib #womensliberations #womensrights #smithcollege #msmagazine #newyorkmagazine #showmagazine #abunnystale #equalrightsamendment #era #prochoice #activism #journalism #fredmcdarrah
In going from freelance reporter to feminist icon, Gloria Steinem has stayed busy. In 1956, Steinem earned a BA from Smith College. After a post-graduation law fellowship, she turned to freelance journalism. In 1963, she wrote an article for Show magazine that put her on the map. To write the article, she went undercover as a Playboy Bunny in order to expose exploitative working conditions in Playboy clubs. It was initially difficult for Steinem to find work after “A Bunny’s Tale” was published, but in 1968 she went on to co-found New York magazine. There, she was able to report on her interests in politics and social issues. In 1969, Steinem attended a “speak-out” on abortion legalization to report for the magazine. She described it as the beginning of her life as a “active feminist”, and allowed her to feel that she shouldn’t be ashamed for an illegal abortion she had at the age of 22. In 1971 co-founded both the National Women’s Political Caucus and the Women’s Action Alliance. In 1972 she co-founded feminist magazine “Ms.”, which would cover the women’s liberation movement and women’s rights issues specifically. Over her life, Steinem has been heavily involved in political campaigns as well as activism in favor of world peace and reproductive freedom. She is especially known as a speaker and writer in the name of women’s rights and feminism. She has received awards for journalism, humanitarianism, gay rights, and women’s empowerment, among others. Steinem has also been portrayed on stage, TV, and in film. At age 86, she is still a world-renowned lecturer and organizer. Steinem is pictured here, speaking at the National Women's Political Caucus at the Four Seasons in 1974. © Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection #womenshistory #womenshistorymonth #photography #photos #filmphotography #film #filmisnotdead #photoftheday #blackandwhitephotography #muuscollection #gloriasteinem #feminism #liberalfeminism #radicalfeminism #intersectionalfemninism #feminist #womenslib #womensliberations #womensrights #smithcollege #msmagazine #newyorkmagazine #showmagazine #abunnystale #equalrightsamendment #era #prochoice #activism #journalism #fredmcdarrah