Mission

The primary focus of the MUUS Collection is to bring together American photography archives from the twentieth century.

Our mission as custodians of this collection is to make visible these exceptional photography archives through exhibitions, scholarship, donations, licensing, and the printing of images and books.

About

The MUUS Collection brings together photographic works that mark major turning points in American history, ultimately creating a road map of our shared past. We believe in the unique power of photography as an inimitable touchstone of collective cultural memory, and it is our goal to preserve and promote these invaluable artifacts for generations to come.

As a functional archive, the MUUS Collection builds, preserves, studies, and shares its outstanding collections of American photography, generating new scholarship and understanding, while instigating interesting and relevant dialogues within the wider photography community. The combined art, archival, and research materials that make up the MUUS Collection ultimately serve to deepen our appreciation of how photography impacts society.

We are dedicated to the critical understanding of historical photography and related media, and aim to highlight the ways in which the visual arts can facilitate a reflection of our shared American history. Where did we come from, and where are we going? What have we learned from our victories and mistakes, and how can we filter these lessons productively through our current moment?

Here, participants march down 6th Avenue during a #PrideParade in 1994, with a sign that reads "AIDS: WHERE IS YOUR RAGE? ACT UP” This is one of the slogans of the activist group, ACT UP (AIDS Coalition Group to Unleash Power).

Perhaps one of the most well known AIDS advocacy groups, they describe themselves as such:
“ACT UP is a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals, united in anger and committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis. We meet with government officials, we distribute the latest medical information, we protest and demonstrate. We are not silent.
 
 ACT UP was formed in response to social neglect, government negligence and the complacency of the medical establishment during the 1980s. Soon it found itself needing to fight corporate greed, lack of solidarity and various forms of stigma and discrimination at home and abroad.
While ACT UP has an incredible history, HIV/AIDS is not history. HIV/AIDS is very much with us. And we call on you to join our fight to end AIDS.”

ACT UP was founded in March 1987, when powerhouse activist and writer Larry Kramer gave a speech at the Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center in NYC. According to “AIDS Demographics” by Douglas Crimp, Kramer posed the question, “Do we want to start a new organization devoted solely to political action?” To the enthusiasm of his audience, a meeting to form such an organization was arranged. Two days later, 300 people gathered to form @actupny.

Though Kramer passed away last summer at age 84, his legacy lives on through his written works and through the ongoing work of ACT UP.
Here, participants march down 6th Avenue during a #PrideParade in 1994, with a sign that reads "AIDS: WHERE IS YOUR RAGE? ACT UP” This is one of the slogans of the activist group, ACT UP (AIDS Coalition Group to Unleash Power). Perhaps one of the most well known AIDS advocacy groups, they describe themselves as such: “ACT UP is a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals, united in anger and committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis. We meet with government officials, we distribute the latest medical information, we protest and demonstrate. We are not silent. ACT UP was formed in response to social neglect, government negligence and the complacency of the medical establishment during the 1980s. Soon it found itself needing to fight corporate greed, lack of solidarity and various forms of stigma and discrimination at home and abroad. While ACT UP has an incredible history, HIV/AIDS is not history. HIV/AIDS is very much with us. And we call on you to join our fight to end AIDS.” ACT UP was founded in March 1987, when powerhouse activist and writer Larry Kramer gave a speech at the Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center in NYC. According to “AIDS Demographics” by Douglas Crimp, Kramer posed the question, “Do we want to start a new organization devoted solely to political action?” To the enthusiasm of his audience, a meeting to form such an organization was arranged. Two days later, 300 people gathered to form @actupny. Though Kramer passed away last summer at age 84, his legacy lives on through his written works and through the ongoing work of ACT UP.
#OnThisDay in 2020, Erik von Schmetterling of @realnatlADAPT (Americans Disabled for Accessible Public Transportation), passed away at age 67. He is seen here at the 1993 March on Washington for Gay, Lesbian, and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation, in a shirt reading 'Disability Pride’.

Dr. Von Schmetterling was an out and proud disabled transman, born in Munich. The son of a Holocaust survivor who suffered severe PTSD, he was abandoned at age 3 and adopted by a family that then moved to the US. In a tribute written by his husband, Dr. von Schmetterling is described as turning to books and education as a refuge from trauma.
He attended Queen’s College in England on scholarship to study medicine, and after graduation, began a residency at Cleveland Metro Hospital.

However, his residency was cut short by a pulmonary embolism that caused him to start losing feeling in his limbs. He became unable to practice medicine and spent time in a home for the disabled and elderly - but after witnessing the mistreatment of folks in that home, felt called to Disability Rights. Erik moved into a wheelchair accessible apartment and started volunteering; he was the 1992-1994 President of Disabled In Action, and worked with ADAPT from 1988 to the time of his passing. He was a deeply compassionate person who believed that people with disabilities had the right to full inclusion and access to life.

Erik married James V. Shrode in a religious ceremony during an ADAPT protest. The two considered their participation in the March on Washington to be a particularly proud moment. They arranged accessibility and resources for disabled LGBTQ folks to attend, providing supportive community for attendees who, like Erik, faced the multiple hurdles of being gay, trans, and disabled. Erik and Jimmi helped make it possible for them to gather and visibly advocate for themselves as part of the larger LGBTQ community.
 
 In honor of Erik and his belief in the power of education, Disability Pride PA  has founded the Erick Von Schmetterling Scholarship to supply disabled Pennsylvanians with funds to pursue higher education.

© Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
#OnThisDay in 2020, Erik von Schmetterling of @realnatlADAPT (Americans Disabled for Accessible Public Transportation), passed away at age 67. He is seen here at the 1993 March on Washington for Gay, Lesbian, and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation, in a shirt reading 'Disability Pride’. Dr. Von Schmetterling was an out and proud disabled transman, born in Munich. The son of a Holocaust survivor who suffered severe PTSD, he was abandoned at age 3 and adopted by a family that then moved to the US. In a tribute written by his husband, Dr. von Schmetterling is described as turning to books and education as a refuge from trauma. He attended Queen’s College in England on scholarship to study medicine, and after graduation, began a residency at Cleveland Metro Hospital. However, his residency was cut short by a pulmonary embolism that caused him to start losing feeling in his limbs. He became unable to practice medicine and spent time in a home for the disabled and elderly - but after witnessing the mistreatment of folks in that home, felt called to Disability Rights. Erik moved into a wheelchair accessible apartment and started volunteering; he was the 1992-1994 President of Disabled In Action, and worked with ADAPT from 1988 to the time of his passing. He was a deeply compassionate person who believed that people with disabilities had the right to full inclusion and access to life. Erik married James V. Shrode in a religious ceremony during an ADAPT protest. The two considered their participation in the March on Washington to be a particularly proud moment. They arranged accessibility and resources for disabled LGBTQ folks to attend, providing supportive community for attendees who, like Erik, faced the multiple hurdles of being gay, trans, and disabled. Erik and Jimmi helped make it possible for them to gather and visibly advocate for themselves as part of the larger LGBTQ community. In honor of Erik and his belief in the power of education, Disability Pride PA has founded the Erick Von Schmetterling Scholarship to supply disabled Pennsylvanians with funds to pursue higher education. © Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
Members of the Gay Urban Truth Squad (GUTS) with a 'Silence Equals Death' banner demonstrate outside the Omni Hotel during the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta, Georgia, July 17, 1988.

An excerpt on GUTS from the November 1996 Issue of D Magazine, article titled “The Pink Mafia”, by Kimberly Goad:
“The Gay Urban Truth Squad, led by activists William Waybourn, Bill Hunt, Bill Nelson and John Thomas, decided early on to adapt to Dallas’ longtime aversion to confrontation while still using action to make a point. When GUTS staged a protest, streets were never blocked, no one was arrested. A GUTS protest was more like a cleverly orchestrated, photo-worthy street drama. In 1988, for instance, the bottom had already fallen out of the Dallas real estate market. [An] empty lot ... had been cleared for development only to have the developer ... file for bankruptcy. Declaring the empty lot a safety hazard, the city council voted to spend $500,000 to fill the giant hole the same year it voted to allot $55,000 to AIDS funding. Thirty-five members of GUTS arrived on the scene after the hole was tilled and turned it into a potter’s field, hammering into the ground hundreds of white crosses bearing the names of people in Dallas County who had died of AIDS. Before GUTS left, the group erected a three-part sign: “The City of Dallas Spent $500,000 Filling This Hole/The City of Dallas Spent $55,000 on AIDS/Dallas County AIDS Deaths Equals 793.” The “protest” was carried on the evening news. The following year, AIDS funding increased to $552,000.”

© Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
Members of the Gay Urban Truth Squad (GUTS) with a 'Silence Equals Death' banner demonstrate outside the Omni Hotel during the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta, Georgia, July 17, 1988. An excerpt on GUTS from the November 1996 Issue of D Magazine, article titled “The Pink Mafia”, by Kimberly Goad: “The Gay Urban Truth Squad, led by activists William Waybourn, Bill Hunt, Bill Nelson and John Thomas, decided early on to adapt to Dallas’ longtime aversion to confrontation while still using action to make a point. When GUTS staged a protest, streets were never blocked, no one was arrested. A GUTS protest was more like a cleverly orchestrated, photo-worthy street drama. In 1988, for instance, the bottom had already fallen out of the Dallas real estate market. [An] empty lot ... had been cleared for development only to have the developer ... file for bankruptcy. Declaring the empty lot a safety hazard, the city council voted to spend $500,000 to fill the giant hole the same year it voted to allot $55,000 to AIDS funding. Thirty-five members of GUTS arrived on the scene after the hole was tilled and turned it into a potter’s field, hammering into the ground hundreds of white crosses bearing the names of people in Dallas County who had died of AIDS. Before GUTS left, the group erected a three-part sign: “The City of Dallas Spent $500,000 Filling This Hole/The City of Dallas Spent $55,000 on AIDS/Dallas County AIDS Deaths Equals 793.” The “protest” was carried on the evening news. The following year, AIDS funding increased to $552,000.” © Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
Here, participants march down 6th Avenue during a #PrideParade in 1994, with a sign that reads "AIDS: WHERE IS YOUR RAGE? ACT UP” This is one of the slogans of the activist group, ACT UP (AIDS Coalition Group to Unleash Power).

Perhaps one of the most well known AIDS advocacy groups, they describe themselves as such:
“ACT UP is a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals, united in anger and committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis. We meet with government officials, we distribute the latest medical information, we protest and demonstrate. We are not silent.
 
 ACT UP was formed in response to social neglect, government negligence and the complacency of the medical establishment during the 1980s. Soon it found itself needing to fight corporate greed, lack of solidarity and various forms of stigma and discrimination at home and abroad.
While ACT UP has an incredible history, HIV/AIDS is not history. HIV/AIDS is very much with us. And we call on you to join our fight to end AIDS.”

ACT UP was founded in March 1987, when powerhouse activist and writer Larry Kramer gave a speech at the Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center in NYC. According to “AIDS Demographics” by Douglas Crimp, Kramer posed the question, “Do we want to start a new organization devoted solely to political action?” To the enthusiasm of his audience, a meeting to form such an organization was arranged. Two days later, 300 people gathered to form @actupny.

Though Kramer passed away last summer at age 84, his legacy lives on through his written works and through the ongoing work of ACT UP.
Here, participants march down 6th Avenue during a #PrideParade in 1994, with a sign that reads "AIDS: WHERE IS YOUR RAGE? ACT UP” This is one of the slogans of the activist group, ACT UP (AIDS Coalition Group to Unleash Power). Perhaps one of the most well known AIDS advocacy groups, they describe themselves as such: “ACT UP is a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals, united in anger and committed to direct action to end the AIDS crisis. We meet with government officials, we distribute the latest medical information, we protest and demonstrate. We are not silent. ACT UP was formed in response to social neglect, government negligence and the complacency of the medical establishment during the 1980s. Soon it found itself needing to fight corporate greed, lack of solidarity and various forms of stigma and discrimination at home and abroad. While ACT UP has an incredible history, HIV/AIDS is not history. HIV/AIDS is very much with us. And we call on you to join our fight to end AIDS.” ACT UP was founded in March 1987, when powerhouse activist and writer Larry Kramer gave a speech at the Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center in NYC. According to “AIDS Demographics” by Douglas Crimp, Kramer posed the question, “Do we want to start a new organization devoted solely to political action?” To the enthusiasm of his audience, a meeting to form such an organization was arranged. Two days later, 300 people gathered to form @actupny. Though Kramer passed away last summer at age 84, his legacy lives on through his written works and through the ongoing work of ACT UP.
#OnThisDay in 2020, Erik von Schmetterling of @realnatlADAPT (Americans Disabled for Accessible Public Transportation), passed away at age 67. He is seen here at the 1993 March on Washington for Gay, Lesbian, and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation, in a shirt reading 'Disability Pride’.

Dr. Von Schmetterling was an out and proud disabled transman, born in Munich. The son of a Holocaust survivor who suffered severe PTSD, he was abandoned at age 3 and adopted by a family that then moved to the US. In a tribute written by his husband, Dr. von Schmetterling is described as turning to books and education as a refuge from trauma.
He attended Queen’s College in England on scholarship to study medicine, and after graduation, began a residency at Cleveland Metro Hospital.

However, his residency was cut short by a pulmonary embolism that caused him to start losing feeling in his limbs. He became unable to practice medicine and spent time in a home for the disabled and elderly - but after witnessing the mistreatment of folks in that home, felt called to Disability Rights. Erik moved into a wheelchair accessible apartment and started volunteering; he was the 1992-1994 President of Disabled In Action, and worked with ADAPT from 1988 to the time of his passing. He was a deeply compassionate person who believed that people with disabilities had the right to full inclusion and access to life.

Erik married James V. Shrode in a religious ceremony during an ADAPT protest. The two considered their participation in the March on Washington to be a particularly proud moment. They arranged accessibility and resources for disabled LGBTQ folks to attend, providing supportive community for attendees who, like Erik, faced the multiple hurdles of being gay, trans, and disabled. Erik and Jimmi helped make it possible for them to gather and visibly advocate for themselves as part of the larger LGBTQ community.
 
 In honor of Erik and his belief in the power of education, Disability Pride PA  has founded the Erick Von Schmetterling Scholarship to supply disabled Pennsylvanians with funds to pursue higher education.

© Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
#OnThisDay in 2020, Erik von Schmetterling of @realnatlADAPT (Americans Disabled for Accessible Public Transportation), passed away at age 67. He is seen here at the 1993 March on Washington for Gay, Lesbian, and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation, in a shirt reading 'Disability Pride’. Dr. Von Schmetterling was an out and proud disabled transman, born in Munich. The son of a Holocaust survivor who suffered severe PTSD, he was abandoned at age 3 and adopted by a family that then moved to the US. In a tribute written by his husband, Dr. von Schmetterling is described as turning to books and education as a refuge from trauma. He attended Queen’s College in England on scholarship to study medicine, and after graduation, began a residency at Cleveland Metro Hospital. However, his residency was cut short by a pulmonary embolism that caused him to start losing feeling in his limbs. He became unable to practice medicine and spent time in a home for the disabled and elderly - but after witnessing the mistreatment of folks in that home, felt called to Disability Rights. Erik moved into a wheelchair accessible apartment and started volunteering; he was the 1992-1994 President of Disabled In Action, and worked with ADAPT from 1988 to the time of his passing. He was a deeply compassionate person who believed that people with disabilities had the right to full inclusion and access to life. Erik married James V. Shrode in a religious ceremony during an ADAPT protest. The two considered their participation in the March on Washington to be a particularly proud moment. They arranged accessibility and resources for disabled LGBTQ folks to attend, providing supportive community for attendees who, like Erik, faced the multiple hurdles of being gay, trans, and disabled. Erik and Jimmi helped make it possible for them to gather and visibly advocate for themselves as part of the larger LGBTQ community. In honor of Erik and his belief in the power of education, Disability Pride PA has founded the Erick Von Schmetterling Scholarship to supply disabled Pennsylvanians with funds to pursue higher education. © Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
Members of the Gay Urban Truth Squad (GUTS) with a 'Silence Equals Death' banner demonstrate outside the Omni Hotel during the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta, Georgia, July 17, 1988.

An excerpt on GUTS from the November 1996 Issue of D Magazine, article titled “The Pink Mafia”, by Kimberly Goad:
“The Gay Urban Truth Squad, led by activists William Waybourn, Bill Hunt, Bill Nelson and John Thomas, decided early on to adapt to Dallas’ longtime aversion to confrontation while still using action to make a point. When GUTS staged a protest, streets were never blocked, no one was arrested. A GUTS protest was more like a cleverly orchestrated, photo-worthy street drama. In 1988, for instance, the bottom had already fallen out of the Dallas real estate market. [An] empty lot ... had been cleared for development only to have the developer ... file for bankruptcy. Declaring the empty lot a safety hazard, the city council voted to spend $500,000 to fill the giant hole the same year it voted to allot $55,000 to AIDS funding. Thirty-five members of GUTS arrived on the scene after the hole was tilled and turned it into a potter’s field, hammering into the ground hundreds of white crosses bearing the names of people in Dallas County who had died of AIDS. Before GUTS left, the group erected a three-part sign: “The City of Dallas Spent $500,000 Filling This Hole/The City of Dallas Spent $55,000 on AIDS/Dallas County AIDS Deaths Equals 793.” The “protest” was carried on the evening news. The following year, AIDS funding increased to $552,000.”

© Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
Members of the Gay Urban Truth Squad (GUTS) with a 'Silence Equals Death' banner demonstrate outside the Omni Hotel during the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta, Georgia, July 17, 1988. An excerpt on GUTS from the November 1996 Issue of D Magazine, article titled “The Pink Mafia”, by Kimberly Goad: “The Gay Urban Truth Squad, led by activists William Waybourn, Bill Hunt, Bill Nelson and John Thomas, decided early on to adapt to Dallas’ longtime aversion to confrontation while still using action to make a point. When GUTS staged a protest, streets were never blocked, no one was arrested. A GUTS protest was more like a cleverly orchestrated, photo-worthy street drama. In 1988, for instance, the bottom had already fallen out of the Dallas real estate market. [An] empty lot ... had been cleared for development only to have the developer ... file for bankruptcy. Declaring the empty lot a safety hazard, the city council voted to spend $500,000 to fill the giant hole the same year it voted to allot $55,000 to AIDS funding. Thirty-five members of GUTS arrived on the scene after the hole was tilled and turned it into a potter’s field, hammering into the ground hundreds of white crosses bearing the names of people in Dallas County who had died of AIDS. Before GUTS left, the group erected a three-part sign: “The City of Dallas Spent $500,000 Filling This Hole/The City of Dallas Spent $55,000 on AIDS/Dallas County AIDS Deaths Equals 793.” The “protest” was carried on the evening news. The following year, AIDS funding increased to $552,000.” © Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
Happy Pride Month! 🌈 The next four weeks at this account will be dedicated to MUUS’ images of LGBTQ pride and resistance. Today, we begin with a set of rare, never before seen images, of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera marching with a banner for their organization S.T.A.R., Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries.

Throughout past decades, LGBTQ people have overcome huge hurdles of discrimination and violence. Same-sex couples can now be married in the US, openly LGBTQ individuals hold political offices, and LGBTQ storylines are no longer illegal or taboo in popular media.

However, there are still many hurdles to be overcome. According to a study by the Center for American Progress published in October, more than 1 in 3 LGBTQ Americans faced discrimination of some kind in the past year. For transgender Americans, the number jumps to 3 in 5. Further, 33 states have introduced over a hundred bills to curb the rights of trans people this year - from exclusion from school athletics, to an outlawing of transgender youth receiving gender-affirming healthcare (which significanlty helps to lower rates of depression and suicide). This slew of anti-trans legislation has made 2021 one of the worst so far for trans youth, who - without acceptance and proper support - are already one of the most vulnerable populations to homelessness, interpersonal violence, and suicide. Thus, we feel it to be our duty to share the history of LGBT people during Pride month, helping to shine a light on both the struggles and joys of this ongoing fight for self-determination and freedom.
Happy Pride Month! 🌈 The next four weeks at this account will be dedicated to MUUS’ images of LGBTQ pride and resistance. Today, we begin with a set of rare, never before seen images, of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera marching with a banner for their organization S.T.A.R., Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries. Throughout past decades, LGBTQ people have overcome huge hurdles of discrimination and violence. Same-sex couples can now be married in the US, openly LGBTQ individuals hold political offices, and LGBTQ storylines are no longer illegal or taboo in popular media. However, there are still many hurdles to be overcome. According to a study by the Center for American Progress published in October, more than 1 in 3 LGBTQ Americans faced discrimination of some kind in the past year. For transgender Americans, the number jumps to 3 in 5. Further, 33 states have introduced over a hundred bills to curb the rights of trans people this year - from exclusion from school athletics, to an outlawing of transgender youth receiving gender-affirming healthcare (which significanlty helps to lower rates of depression and suicide). This slew of anti-trans legislation has made 2021 one of the worst so far for trans youth, who - without acceptance and proper support - are already one of the most vulnerable populations to homelessness, interpersonal violence, and suicide. Thus, we feel it to be our duty to share the history of LGBT people during Pride month, helping to shine a light on both the struggles and joys of this ongoing fight for self-determination and freedom.
"The revolution will not be televised. That was about the fact that the first change that takes place is in your mind. You have to change your mind before you change the way you live and the way you move. So when we said the revolution will not be televised, we were saying...that the thing that’s going to change people is something that no one will ever be able to capture on film." Today marks a decade since the death of Gil Scott-Heron.

With his rhythmic, musical delivery of spoken word poetry, Scott-Heron is considered by many to be the first rapper, and made an immense impact on the later genres of hip hop and neo soul. However, he took no responsibility for later genres and preferred to refer to himself as a “bluesologist” - that is, “a scientist who is concerned with the origin of the blues”.

After graduating high school, Scott-Heron attended @lincolnuniversityofpa, the alma mater of one of his biggest influences, Langston Hughes - but dropped out to write his first two novels. His first, “The Vulture”, was published to positive reception in 1970. He never returned for his BA, but instead went on to receive an MA in Creative Writing from @johnshopkinsu. He then began lecturing full-time at the @universityofdc.

At this point, Scott-Heron had released three LPs, which contended with issues of mass media and consumerism, the ignorance of the white middle-class, and issues of revolutionary black politics. He is most known for his early single “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” (1971), and was an active touring and recording artist for his entire life. His last album was the acclaimed “I’m New Here”, released just a year before his death in 2011. While the exact cause of death is not public, Scott-Heron confirmed in 2008 that he was HIV-positive and had been struggling with drug addiction and various health problems. 

In 2012, Scott-Heron received a posthumous Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and in 2021, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

📸 © Allan Tannenbaum/MUUS Collection
"The revolution will not be televised. That was about the fact that the first change that takes place is in your mind. You have to change your mind before you change the way you live and the way you move. So when we said the revolution will not be televised, we were saying...that the thing that’s going to change people is something that no one will ever be able to capture on film." Today marks a decade since the death of Gil Scott-Heron. With his rhythmic, musical delivery of spoken word poetry, Scott-Heron is considered by many to be the first rapper, and made an immense impact on the later genres of hip hop and neo soul. However, he took no responsibility for later genres and preferred to refer to himself as a “bluesologist” - that is, “a scientist who is concerned with the origin of the blues”. After graduating high school, Scott-Heron attended @lincolnuniversityofpa, the alma mater of one of his biggest influences, Langston Hughes - but dropped out to write his first two novels. His first, “The Vulture”, was published to positive reception in 1970. He never returned for his BA, but instead went on to receive an MA in Creative Writing from @johnshopkinsu. He then began lecturing full-time at the @universityofdc. At this point, Scott-Heron had released three LPs, which contended with issues of mass media and consumerism, the ignorance of the white middle-class, and issues of revolutionary black politics. He is most known for his early single “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” (1971), and was an active touring and recording artist for his entire life. His last album was the acclaimed “I’m New Here”, released just a year before his death in 2011. While the exact cause of death is not public, Scott-Heron confirmed in 2008 that he was HIV-positive and had been struggling with drug addiction and various health problems. In 2012, Scott-Heron received a posthumous Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and in 2021, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. 📸 © Allan Tannenbaum/MUUS Collection