Mission

The primary focus of the MUUS Collection is to bring together American photography archives from the twentieth century.

Our mission as custodians of this collection is to make visible these exceptional photography archives through exhibitions, scholarship, donations, licensing, and the printing of images and books.

About

The MUUS Collection brings together photographic works that mark major turning points in American history, ultimately creating a road map of our shared past. We believe in the unique power of photography as an inimitable touchstone of collective cultural memory, and it is our goal to preserve and promote these invaluable artifacts for generations to come.

As a functional archive, the MUUS Collection builds, preserves, studies, and shares its outstanding collections of American photography, generating new scholarship and understanding, while instigating interesting and relevant dialogues within the wider photography community. The combined art, archival, and research materials that make up the MUUS Collection ultimately serve to deepen our appreciation of how photography impacts society.

We are dedicated to the critical understanding of historical photography and related media, and aim to highlight the ways in which the visual arts can facilitate a reflection of our shared American history. Where did we come from, and where are we going? What have we learned from our victories and mistakes, and how can we filter these lessons productively through our current moment?

Langston Hughes was one of the most well-known leaders of the Harlem Renaissance, but among the most influential American writers of the 20th century. Hughes was a poet, as well as a novelist, playwright, columnist, and social activist. His work revolved around the African American experience, aiming to show the realities of life for black people in America. Hughes honest portrayals confronted racist stereotypes in an honest, direct, and colloquial style. Through his work, he advocated for black pride and racial consciousness, and the uniting of African people. For this, his work was especially embraced by common Black folks of all backgrounds. Thanks to his popularity, Hughes became the first African American to fully support himself through his writing. Throughout his life, he lived in various American cities, traveled Europe, Mexico, and West Africa, worked in restaurants, on farms, at sea, and took courses at multiple colleges before graduating from Lincoln University. These diverse experiences informed Hughes’ diverse extensive body of work. The rhythmic writing style for which he was known, influenced by jazz and blues music, made him an early innovator of “jazz poetry”. Hughes first saw his work published in 1921 with the poem “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” in the NAACP magazine The Crisis. Among his considerable array of works were poetry books The Weary Blue (1926) and Not Without Laughter (1930). Hughes also wrote 11 plays, the “Simple” book series, two autobiographies, and a weekly column that ran for 20 years in The Chicago Defender. This is not to mention various other novels, musical projects, magazine projects, and children’s books. In total, Hughes earned 9 literary awards and fellowships throughout his life. Hughes’ writing changed the face of American literature and has continued to influence the work of Black poets and novelists today. #BlackHistoryMonth

📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection 

#blackhistory #blm #blacklivesmatter #langstonhughes #poetry #poet #langstonhughespoetry #poetryreading #history #blackauthors #blackpoets #blackliterature #inspiring #author #picoftheday #photooftheday #photography #photographer
Langston Hughes was one of the most well-known leaders of the Harlem Renaissance, but among the most influential American writers of the 20th century. Hughes was a poet, as well as a novelist, playwright, columnist, and social activist. His work revolved around the African American experience, aiming to show the realities of life for black people in America. Hughes honest portrayals confronted racist stereotypes in an honest, direct, and colloquial style. Through his work, he advocated for black pride and racial consciousness, and the uniting of African people. For this, his work was especially embraced by common Black folks of all backgrounds. Thanks to his popularity, Hughes became the first African American to fully support himself through his writing. Throughout his life, he lived in various American cities, traveled Europe, Mexico, and West Africa, worked in restaurants, on farms, at sea, and took courses at multiple colleges before graduating from Lincoln University. These diverse experiences informed Hughes’ diverse extensive body of work. The rhythmic writing style for which he was known, influenced by jazz and blues music, made him an early innovator of “jazz poetry”. Hughes first saw his work published in 1921 with the poem “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” in the NAACP magazine The Crisis. Among his considerable array of works were poetry books The Weary Blue (1926) and Not Without Laughter (1930). Hughes also wrote 11 plays, the “Simple” book series, two autobiographies, and a weekly column that ran for 20 years in The Chicago Defender. This is not to mention various other novels, musical projects, magazine projects, and children’s books. In total, Hughes earned 9 literary awards and fellowships throughout his life. Hughes’ writing changed the face of American literature and has continued to influence the work of Black poets and novelists today. #BlackHistoryMonth 📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection #blackhistory #blm #blacklivesmatter #langstonhughes #poetry #poet #langstonhughespoetry #poetryreading #history #blackauthors #blackpoets #blackliterature #inspiring #author #picoftheday #photooftheday #photography #photographer
On February 21, 1965, Malcolm X was assassinated at the Audobon Ballroom in New York City. 
Born Malcolm Little, he took on the surname "X" during a 10 year period of imprisonment. While imprisoned, he developed his literacy skills and converted to the Nation of Islam, a Muslim movement preaching Black self-reliance and the return of diaspora to the African continent. Upon leaving prison, he gained notoriety in the 1950s preaching the radical ideas that Black people should defend or liberate themselves "by any means necessary". He also harshly criticized leaders like MLK Jr. for working with the white establishment to organize events like the March on Washington. However, he cut ties with the Nation of Islam and its leader, Elijah Muhammad in 1964. X instead began to work with civil rights leaders and advocating for African Americans to participate in voting and politics. He converted to Sunni Islam, and after completing the Hajj, changed his name to Malik el-Shabazz. This was a major turning point in his racial politics. X had advocated for racial segregation and Black supremacy in the '50s, but performing the Hajj led him to believe that racial problems could be overcome with the help of Islam. He spent much of 1964 touring, meeting with officials, and giving speeches and interviews in various African countries. He also spoke in Europe and at meetings of his groups, the Organization for Afro-American Unity and Muslim Mosque, Inc. in the United States.
Throughout this period, he and his family were threatened multiple times by the Nation of Islam, evading both a car bombing and housefire. In 1965, he was successfully assassinated when three gunmen attacked X at an OAAU address at the Audobon Ballroom. Tens of thousands of mourners attended the public viewing prior to his funeral and even MLK Jr., despite his disagreements with X, stated a "deep affection for Malcolm" and his "great ability to put his finger on the existence and root of the problem". Though his views were incredibly controversial, he has been described as one of the most important and influential figures of the Black Power and Civil Rights movements. 

📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
On February 21, 1965, Malcolm X was assassinated at the Audobon Ballroom in New York City. Born Malcolm Little, he took on the surname "X" during a 10 year period of imprisonment. While imprisoned, he developed his literacy skills and converted to the Nation of Islam, a Muslim movement preaching Black self-reliance and the return of diaspora to the African continent. Upon leaving prison, he gained notoriety in the 1950s preaching the radical ideas that Black people should defend or liberate themselves "by any means necessary". He also harshly criticized leaders like MLK Jr. for working with the white establishment to organize events like the March on Washington. However, he cut ties with the Nation of Islam and its leader, Elijah Muhammad in 1964. X instead began to work with civil rights leaders and advocating for African Americans to participate in voting and politics. He converted to Sunni Islam, and after completing the Hajj, changed his name to Malik el-Shabazz. This was a major turning point in his racial politics. X had advocated for racial segregation and Black supremacy in the '50s, but performing the Hajj led him to believe that racial problems could be overcome with the help of Islam. He spent much of 1964 touring, meeting with officials, and giving speeches and interviews in various African countries. He also spoke in Europe and at meetings of his groups, the Organization for Afro-American Unity and Muslim Mosque, Inc. in the United States. Throughout this period, he and his family were threatened multiple times by the Nation of Islam, evading both a car bombing and housefire. In 1965, he was successfully assassinated when three gunmen attacked X at an OAAU address at the Audobon Ballroom. Tens of thousands of mourners attended the public viewing prior to his funeral and even MLK Jr., despite his disagreements with X, stated a "deep affection for Malcolm" and his "great ability to put his finger on the existence and root of the problem". Though his views were incredibly controversial, he has been described as one of the most important and influential figures of the Black Power and Civil Rights movements. 📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
Happy birthday Smokey Robinson, who was born #onthisday in 1940! 

Robinson is known best for being part of the band, "The Miracles," and as a solo artist. In 1955, Robinson and his friends Pete Moore, Ronald White, Bobby Rogers and Claudette Rogers formed a band called "The Matadors," but their name was changed soonafter to "The Miracles" before setting out on tour. In 1957, the band met CEO of Motown Records Berry Gordy who offered the band a record contract. The Miracles then became one of the first bands signed to Motown Records. The band was largely successful between 1960 and 1970, and Robinson became one of the most coveted songwriters in th industry. He wrote songs for many artists including Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross, The Supremes and Steve Wonder and eventually became VP of Moton Records until 1988. He later left Moton Records and signed with SBK Records, under which he produced his latest album, "Smokey and Friends," which featured many musicians including Elton John, James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt. Later in his life, he struggled with drug abuse but eventually got clean and went on to write an autobiography. Since then, he has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Songwriter's Hall of Fame and was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He was also awarded with the National Medal of Arts, the Heritage Award at the Soul Train Music Awards, has been conferred the degree of Doctor of Music by Howard University and has won multiple Grammy Awards. #BlackHistoryMonth

📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection 

#smokeyrobinson #themiracles #happybirthday #blackhistory #music #musician #portrait #photography #photographer #photooftheday #picoftheday #pictureoftheday #blm #blacklivesmatter #fredmcdarrah #muuscollection #history #americanhistory #howarduniversity #rockandrollhalloffame #soultrainawards #soultrain #lindaronstadt  #jamestaylor #eltonjohn #songwriter #motown #motownrecords
Happy birthday Smokey Robinson, who was born #onthisday in 1940! Robinson is known best for being part of the band, "The Miracles," and as a solo artist. In 1955, Robinson and his friends Pete Moore, Ronald White, Bobby Rogers and Claudette Rogers formed a band called "The Matadors," but their name was changed soonafter to "The Miracles" before setting out on tour. In 1957, the band met CEO of Motown Records Berry Gordy who offered the band a record contract. The Miracles then became one of the first bands signed to Motown Records. The band was largely successful between 1960 and 1970, and Robinson became one of the most coveted songwriters in th industry. He wrote songs for many artists including Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross, The Supremes and Steve Wonder and eventually became VP of Moton Records until 1988. He later left Moton Records and signed with SBK Records, under which he produced his latest album, "Smokey and Friends," which featured many musicians including Elton John, James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt. Later in his life, he struggled with drug abuse but eventually got clean and went on to write an autobiography. Since then, he has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Songwriter's Hall of Fame and was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He was also awarded with the National Medal of Arts, the Heritage Award at the Soul Train Music Awards, has been conferred the degree of Doctor of Music by Howard University and has won multiple Grammy Awards. #BlackHistoryMonth 📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection #smokeyrobinson #themiracles #happybirthday #blackhistory #music #musician #portrait #photography #photographer #photooftheday #picoftheday #pictureoftheday #blm #blacklivesmatter #fredmcdarrah #muuscollection #history #americanhistory #howarduniversity #rockandrollhalloffame #soultrainawards #soultrain #lindaronstadt #jamestaylor #eltonjohn #songwriter #motown #motownrecords
Langston Hughes was one of the most well-known leaders of the Harlem Renaissance, but among the most influential American writers of the 20th century. Hughes was a poet, as well as a novelist, playwright, columnist, and social activist. His work revolved around the African American experience, aiming to show the realities of life for black people in America. Hughes honest portrayals confronted racist stereotypes in an honest, direct, and colloquial style. Through his work, he advocated for black pride and racial consciousness, and the uniting of African people. For this, his work was especially embraced by common Black folks of all backgrounds. Thanks to his popularity, Hughes became the first African American to fully support himself through his writing. Throughout his life, he lived in various American cities, traveled Europe, Mexico, and West Africa, worked in restaurants, on farms, at sea, and took courses at multiple colleges before graduating from Lincoln University. These diverse experiences informed Hughes’ diverse extensive body of work. The rhythmic writing style for which he was known, influenced by jazz and blues music, made him an early innovator of “jazz poetry”. Hughes first saw his work published in 1921 with the poem “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” in the NAACP magazine The Crisis. Among his considerable array of works were poetry books The Weary Blue (1926) and Not Without Laughter (1930). Hughes also wrote 11 plays, the “Simple” book series, two autobiographies, and a weekly column that ran for 20 years in The Chicago Defender. This is not to mention various other novels, musical projects, magazine projects, and children’s books. In total, Hughes earned 9 literary awards and fellowships throughout his life. Hughes’ writing changed the face of American literature and has continued to influence the work of Black poets and novelists today. #BlackHistoryMonth

📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection 

#blackhistory #blm #blacklivesmatter #langstonhughes #poetry #poet #langstonhughespoetry #poetryreading #history #blackauthors #blackpoets #blackliterature #inspiring #author #picoftheday #photooftheday #photography #photographer
Langston Hughes was one of the most well-known leaders of the Harlem Renaissance, but among the most influential American writers of the 20th century. Hughes was a poet, as well as a novelist, playwright, columnist, and social activist. His work revolved around the African American experience, aiming to show the realities of life for black people in America. Hughes honest portrayals confronted racist stereotypes in an honest, direct, and colloquial style. Through his work, he advocated for black pride and racial consciousness, and the uniting of African people. For this, his work was especially embraced by common Black folks of all backgrounds. Thanks to his popularity, Hughes became the first African American to fully support himself through his writing. Throughout his life, he lived in various American cities, traveled Europe, Mexico, and West Africa, worked in restaurants, on farms, at sea, and took courses at multiple colleges before graduating from Lincoln University. These diverse experiences informed Hughes’ diverse extensive body of work. The rhythmic writing style for which he was known, influenced by jazz and blues music, made him an early innovator of “jazz poetry”. Hughes first saw his work published in 1921 with the poem “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” in the NAACP magazine The Crisis. Among his considerable array of works were poetry books The Weary Blue (1926) and Not Without Laughter (1930). Hughes also wrote 11 plays, the “Simple” book series, two autobiographies, and a weekly column that ran for 20 years in The Chicago Defender. This is not to mention various other novels, musical projects, magazine projects, and children’s books. In total, Hughes earned 9 literary awards and fellowships throughout his life. Hughes’ writing changed the face of American literature and has continued to influence the work of Black poets and novelists today. #BlackHistoryMonth 📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection #blackhistory #blm #blacklivesmatter #langstonhughes #poetry #poet #langstonhughespoetry #poetryreading #history #blackauthors #blackpoets #blackliterature #inspiring #author #picoftheday #photooftheday #photography #photographer
On February 21, 1965, Malcolm X was assassinated at the Audobon Ballroom in New York City. 
Born Malcolm Little, he took on the surname "X" during a 10 year period of imprisonment. While imprisoned, he developed his literacy skills and converted to the Nation of Islam, a Muslim movement preaching Black self-reliance and the return of diaspora to the African continent. Upon leaving prison, he gained notoriety in the 1950s preaching the radical ideas that Black people should defend or liberate themselves "by any means necessary". He also harshly criticized leaders like MLK Jr. for working with the white establishment to organize events like the March on Washington. However, he cut ties with the Nation of Islam and its leader, Elijah Muhammad in 1964. X instead began to work with civil rights leaders and advocating for African Americans to participate in voting and politics. He converted to Sunni Islam, and after completing the Hajj, changed his name to Malik el-Shabazz. This was a major turning point in his racial politics. X had advocated for racial segregation and Black supremacy in the '50s, but performing the Hajj led him to believe that racial problems could be overcome with the help of Islam. He spent much of 1964 touring, meeting with officials, and giving speeches and interviews in various African countries. He also spoke in Europe and at meetings of his groups, the Organization for Afro-American Unity and Muslim Mosque, Inc. in the United States.
Throughout this period, he and his family were threatened multiple times by the Nation of Islam, evading both a car bombing and housefire. In 1965, he was successfully assassinated when three gunmen attacked X at an OAAU address at the Audobon Ballroom. Tens of thousands of mourners attended the public viewing prior to his funeral and even MLK Jr., despite his disagreements with X, stated a "deep affection for Malcolm" and his "great ability to put his finger on the existence and root of the problem". Though his views were incredibly controversial, he has been described as one of the most important and influential figures of the Black Power and Civil Rights movements. 

📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
On February 21, 1965, Malcolm X was assassinated at the Audobon Ballroom in New York City. Born Malcolm Little, he took on the surname "X" during a 10 year period of imprisonment. While imprisoned, he developed his literacy skills and converted to the Nation of Islam, a Muslim movement preaching Black self-reliance and the return of diaspora to the African continent. Upon leaving prison, he gained notoriety in the 1950s preaching the radical ideas that Black people should defend or liberate themselves "by any means necessary". He also harshly criticized leaders like MLK Jr. for working with the white establishment to organize events like the March on Washington. However, he cut ties with the Nation of Islam and its leader, Elijah Muhammad in 1964. X instead began to work with civil rights leaders and advocating for African Americans to participate in voting and politics. He converted to Sunni Islam, and after completing the Hajj, changed his name to Malik el-Shabazz. This was a major turning point in his racial politics. X had advocated for racial segregation and Black supremacy in the '50s, but performing the Hajj led him to believe that racial problems could be overcome with the help of Islam. He spent much of 1964 touring, meeting with officials, and giving speeches and interviews in various African countries. He also spoke in Europe and at meetings of his groups, the Organization for Afro-American Unity and Muslim Mosque, Inc. in the United States. Throughout this period, he and his family were threatened multiple times by the Nation of Islam, evading both a car bombing and housefire. In 1965, he was successfully assassinated when three gunmen attacked X at an OAAU address at the Audobon Ballroom. Tens of thousands of mourners attended the public viewing prior to his funeral and even MLK Jr., despite his disagreements with X, stated a "deep affection for Malcolm" and his "great ability to put his finger on the existence and root of the problem". Though his views were incredibly controversial, he has been described as one of the most important and influential figures of the Black Power and Civil Rights movements. 📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection
Happy birthday Smokey Robinson, who was born #onthisday in 1940! 

Robinson is known best for being part of the band, "The Miracles," and as a solo artist. In 1955, Robinson and his friends Pete Moore, Ronald White, Bobby Rogers and Claudette Rogers formed a band called "The Matadors," but their name was changed soonafter to "The Miracles" before setting out on tour. In 1957, the band met CEO of Motown Records Berry Gordy who offered the band a record contract. The Miracles then became one of the first bands signed to Motown Records. The band was largely successful between 1960 and 1970, and Robinson became one of the most coveted songwriters in th industry. He wrote songs for many artists including Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross, The Supremes and Steve Wonder and eventually became VP of Moton Records until 1988. He later left Moton Records and signed with SBK Records, under which he produced his latest album, "Smokey and Friends," which featured many musicians including Elton John, James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt. Later in his life, he struggled with drug abuse but eventually got clean and went on to write an autobiography. Since then, he has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Songwriter's Hall of Fame and was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He was also awarded with the National Medal of Arts, the Heritage Award at the Soul Train Music Awards, has been conferred the degree of Doctor of Music by Howard University and has won multiple Grammy Awards. #BlackHistoryMonth

📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection 

#smokeyrobinson #themiracles #happybirthday #blackhistory #music #musician #portrait #photography #photographer #photooftheday #picoftheday #pictureoftheday #blm #blacklivesmatter #fredmcdarrah #muuscollection #history #americanhistory #howarduniversity #rockandrollhalloffame #soultrainawards #soultrain #lindaronstadt  #jamestaylor #eltonjohn #songwriter #motown #motownrecords
Happy birthday Smokey Robinson, who was born #onthisday in 1940! Robinson is known best for being part of the band, "The Miracles," and as a solo artist. In 1955, Robinson and his friends Pete Moore, Ronald White, Bobby Rogers and Claudette Rogers formed a band called "The Matadors," but their name was changed soonafter to "The Miracles" before setting out on tour. In 1957, the band met CEO of Motown Records Berry Gordy who offered the band a record contract. The Miracles then became one of the first bands signed to Motown Records. The band was largely successful between 1960 and 1970, and Robinson became one of the most coveted songwriters in th industry. He wrote songs for many artists including Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross, The Supremes and Steve Wonder and eventually became VP of Moton Records until 1988. He later left Moton Records and signed with SBK Records, under which he produced his latest album, "Smokey and Friends," which featured many musicians including Elton John, James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt. Later in his life, he struggled with drug abuse but eventually got clean and went on to write an autobiography. Since then, he has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Songwriter's Hall of Fame and was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He was also awarded with the National Medal of Arts, the Heritage Award at the Soul Train Music Awards, has been conferred the degree of Doctor of Music by Howard University and has won multiple Grammy Awards. #BlackHistoryMonth 📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection #smokeyrobinson #themiracles #happybirthday #blackhistory #music #musician #portrait #photography #photographer #photooftheday #picoftheday #pictureoftheday #blm #blacklivesmatter #fredmcdarrah #muuscollection #history #americanhistory #howarduniversity #rockandrollhalloffame #soultrainawards #soultrain #lindaronstadt #jamestaylor #eltonjohn #songwriter #motown #motownrecords
#Onthisday in 1931, American author and professor Toni Morrison was born in Lorain, Ohio. In 1949, Morrison attended the historically Black college Howard University in Washington, DC, where she experience racially segregated buses and restaurants for the first time. In 1955, she went on to get her Master of Arts from Cornell, and began teaching shortly after. In 1965, Morrison became an editor for Random House in Syracuse, and was then transferred to the New York City offices, where she became the first black woman senior editor in the fiction department; her role allowed her to bring Black literature into the mainstream. Morrison began spending more time on developing her own writing and in 1970, her first book, "The Bluest Eye," was published. In 1975, "Sula," her second book, was published and was nominated for a National Book Award. She went on to write many books including "Tar Baby" and "Song of Solomon," which won a National Book Critics Award. In 1987, Morrison published another book called "Beloved," which developed into a trilogy, and ultimately won her a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the Anisfieled-Wolf Book Award. In 1993, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature and in 2012, Morrison was honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Barack Obama. Her novels address aspects of racism that were often disregarded in mainstream literature, so her rise to becoming a well-known author opened the door for recognition of Black literature and the struggle in which Black folx endure. Her novels are now mainstays in both high school and college classrooms, and she will forever be remembered as a literary revolutionary who paved the way for future Black authors. 

Toni Morrison is seen here at the 54th Academy Awards in 1982.
#BlackHistoryMonth

📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection

#muuscollection #blm #blacklivesmatter #blackhistory #tonimorrison #author #poet #sula #smoking #academyawards #photography #photographer #pictureoftheday #picoftheday #photooftheday #documentaryphotography #fredmcdarrah #nyc #newyorkcity #happybirthday #celebrateblackhistory #celebrateblackwomen #bookstagram #femalewriters #thebluesteye #literature #nobelprizewinner
#Onthisday in 1931, American author and professor Toni Morrison was born in Lorain, Ohio. In 1949, Morrison attended the historically Black college Howard University in Washington, DC, where she experience racially segregated buses and restaurants for the first time. In 1955, she went on to get her Master of Arts from Cornell, and began teaching shortly after. In 1965, Morrison became an editor for Random House in Syracuse, and was then transferred to the New York City offices, where she became the first black woman senior editor in the fiction department; her role allowed her to bring Black literature into the mainstream. Morrison began spending more time on developing her own writing and in 1970, her first book, "The Bluest Eye," was published. In 1975, "Sula," her second book, was published and was nominated for a National Book Award. She went on to write many books including "Tar Baby" and "Song of Solomon," which won a National Book Critics Award. In 1987, Morrison published another book called "Beloved," which developed into a trilogy, and ultimately won her a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the Anisfieled-Wolf Book Award. In 1993, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature and in 2012, Morrison was honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Barack Obama. Her novels address aspects of racism that were often disregarded in mainstream literature, so her rise to becoming a well-known author opened the door for recognition of Black literature and the struggle in which Black folx endure. Her novels are now mainstays in both high school and college classrooms, and she will forever be remembered as a literary revolutionary who paved the way for future Black authors. Toni Morrison is seen here at the 54th Academy Awards in 1982. #BlackHistoryMonth 📷©️Fred W. McDarrah/MUUS Collection #muuscollection #blm #blacklivesmatter #blackhistory #tonimorrison #author #poet #sula #smoking #academyawards #photography #photographer #pictureoftheday #picoftheday #photooftheday #documentaryphotography #fredmcdarrah #nyc #newyorkcity #happybirthday #celebrateblackhistory #celebrateblackwomen #bookstagram #femalewriters #thebluesteye #literature #nobelprizewinner
Happy Valentine’s Day! 

Named the sexiest photo of all time by actress Diane Keaton, “The Kiss” was taken minutes before Elvis’ concert at The Mosque Theater in 1956. 

From a 2014 @smithsonianmagazine interview with photographer Alfred Wertheimer on how he captured “The Kiss”: 

“I was in the men's room on the floor above the stage area at the Mosque Theater in Richmond, Virginia, on June 30 of 1956. I got more or less sidetracked and then I turned around and said: “Where’s Elvis?” Elvis had disappeared. I go down the stairs of the theater. I get down to the landing where the stage area is. You’ve now got 3,000 kids, mostly girls, in there, and the "Elvis Presley Show" is going on; except there’s no Elvis Presley around. I look down this long, narrow passageway, the light at the end of the tunnel. There’s a silhouette of two people at the far end, and I say, “Oh yes, there’s Elvis, with a girl, his date for the day.” Do I interrupt them? Do I squeeze off a frame or two from a distance or do I go closer in? Well, you start off becoming a human tripod, because you don’t want to start using flash. It’s really quite dark.

...

So now I’m not satisfied, typically. I’m not satisfied with what? I’m not satisfied with back lighting. I want front lighting. But the only way to get front lighting is to go beyond where they are. So I put on my best maintenance man voice and say, “Excuse me, coming through.” I squeeze past the two of them. Again they don’t pay attention to me because they’re like hypnotizing each other.  I’m now set on the landing facing the two of them, and I’m setting myself with the frame. It’s a fairly decent composition, and I’m waiting for something to happen within my frame. She says to him: “Elvis, I’ll betcha can’t kiss me,” and she sticks out her tongue just a teeny bit. And he says, “I’ll betcha I can,” in a very masculine, cool way. And he then approaches the kiss, he’s got his tongue stuck out just a wee bit, and he overshoots the mark.”

📷©️Alfred Wertheimer/MUUS Collection
Happy Valentine’s Day! Named the sexiest photo of all time by actress Diane Keaton, “The Kiss” was taken minutes before Elvis’ concert at The Mosque Theater in 1956. From a 2014 @smithsonianmagazine interview with photographer Alfred Wertheimer on how he captured “The Kiss”: “I was in the men's room on the floor above the stage area at the Mosque Theater in Richmond, Virginia, on June 30 of 1956. I got more or less sidetracked and then I turned around and said: “Where’s Elvis?” Elvis had disappeared. I go down the stairs of the theater. I get down to the landing where the stage area is. You’ve now got 3,000 kids, mostly girls, in there, and the "Elvis Presley Show" is going on; except there’s no Elvis Presley around. I look down this long, narrow passageway, the light at the end of the tunnel. There’s a silhouette of two people at the far end, and I say, “Oh yes, there’s Elvis, with a girl, his date for the day.” Do I interrupt them? Do I squeeze off a frame or two from a distance or do I go closer in? Well, you start off becoming a human tripod, because you don’t want to start using flash. It’s really quite dark. ... So now I’m not satisfied, typically. I’m not satisfied with what? I’m not satisfied with back lighting. I want front lighting. But the only way to get front lighting is to go beyond where they are. So I put on my best maintenance man voice and say, “Excuse me, coming through.” I squeeze past the two of them. Again they don’t pay attention to me because they’re like hypnotizing each other. I’m now set on the landing facing the two of them, and I’m setting myself with the frame. It’s a fairly decent composition, and I’m waiting for something to happen within my frame. She says to him: “Elvis, I’ll betcha can’t kiss me,” and she sticks out her tongue just a teeny bit. And he says, “I’ll betcha I can,” in a very masculine, cool way. And he then approaches the kiss, he’s got his tongue stuck out just a wee bit, and he overshoots the mark.” 📷©️Alfred Wertheimer/MUUS Collection
Today’s spotlight is on Bishop Daddy Grace. Daddy Grace, who was born in 1881 in Brava, Cape Verde as Marcelino Manuel da Garça, was the founder and first bishop of the United House of Prayer For All People, a predominately African American Christian denomination. In 1919, he built the first house of prayer in West Wareham, MA, and later established branches in Charlotte, NC and Newark, NJ. His believers considered him to be a faith healer and miracle worker, and many saw his miraculous acts of healing and ministry as a sign from God of the imminent return of Jesus Christ. Over a short period of time, Grace and his church amassed a large number of followers despite being seen by the public as an illegitimate church in which the leaders were exploiting their middle-lower class patrons. Daddy Grace was an eccentric and flashy man who wore large jewelry, flamboyant clothing, and had incredibly long hair and fingernails, which added to the public’s skepticism about the denomination. As you can see in these photos, Bishop Grace is holding a stack of money—he was adamant that all the money he collected from sermons and baptisms was redistributed to the lesser fortunate. Daddy Grace was known for his very large baptisms, in which he would baptize hundreds to thousands of people at once. 

These photos were taking on July 1, 1955 in Harlem, during Daddy Grace’s Baptismal Parade, where hundreds were baptized with a fire house. #BlackHistoryMonth

📷©️Alfred Wertheimer/MUUS Collection

#daddygrace #baptism #money #cash #fingernails #longnails #harlem #church #unitedhouseofprayerforallpeople #religion #christian #blacklivesmatter #blackhistory #history #americanhistory #bishop #pastor #fatherdivine #blm #church #faith #photography #photographer #nyc #newyorkcity #harlemnyc #picoftheday #photooftheday #documentaryphotography #photojournalism
Today’s spotlight is on Bishop Daddy Grace. Daddy Grace, who was born in 1881 in Brava, Cape Verde as Marcelino Manuel da Garça, was the founder and first bishop of the United House of Prayer For All People, a predominately African American Christian denomination. In 1919, he built the first house of prayer in West Wareham, MA, and later established branches in Charlotte, NC and Newark, NJ. His believers considered him to be a faith healer and miracle worker, and many saw his miraculous acts of healing and ministry as a sign from God of the imminent return of Jesus Christ. Over a short period of time, Grace and his church amassed a large number of followers despite being seen by the public as an illegitimate church in which the leaders were exploiting their middle-lower class patrons. Daddy Grace was an eccentric and flashy man who wore large jewelry, flamboyant clothing, and had incredibly long hair and fingernails, which added to the public’s skepticism about the denomination. As you can see in these photos, Bishop Grace is holding a stack of money—he was adamant that all the money he collected from sermons and baptisms was redistributed to the lesser fortunate. Daddy Grace was known for his very large baptisms, in which he would baptize hundreds to thousands of people at once. These photos were taking on July 1, 1955 in Harlem, during Daddy Grace’s Baptismal Parade, where hundreds were baptized with a fire house. #BlackHistoryMonth 📷©️Alfred Wertheimer/MUUS Collection #daddygrace #baptism #money #cash #fingernails #longnails #harlem #church #unitedhouseofprayerforallpeople #religion #christian #blacklivesmatter #blackhistory #history #americanhistory #bishop #pastor #fatherdivine #blm #church #faith #photography #photographer #nyc #newyorkcity #harlemnyc #picoftheday #photooftheday #documentaryphotography #photojournalism